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September 07, 2005

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Death to Multi-tasking! Long live chunking!:

» Multi-Tasking Stinks from David V. Lorenzo
Focus! Use the natural momentum you have built up to continue what you started. Follow-through and gain the satisfaction that comes with task completion. Lisa at Management Craft has some thoughts about getting “chunky” (no there is no chocolate involv... [Read More]

» The Dangerous Myth of Multi-Tasking from The Coyote Within
The truth about multi-tasking is simple. You can never have more than 100 percent of your attention available. Split it across two tasks and nothing changes. Still 100 percent. Only now each task has 50 percent — or one has 70 percent and the other 30 ... [Read More]

» Management Craft: Death to Multi-tasking! Long live chunking! from Brad's Link Blog
Management Craft: Death to Multi-tasking! Long live chunking!: Technorati Tags: GTD, Productive, Tips [Read More]

» Death to Multi-tasking! Long live chunking! from Achieve-IT! goal setting blog
Lisa over at Management Craft has done an experiment where she stopped multitasking for 4 entire days and focused instead on one project for extended periods of time. What was her result? Multitasking is the devil. Management Craft: Death to [Read More]

» Does All That New Technology Make us Smarter? from BusinessPundit
Well, does it?Intelligence, as it impacts the economist Valderrama, is our capacity to adapt and thrive in our own environment. In a Darwinian sense, it's as true now as it was millions of years ago, when man's aptitude for hearing... [Read More]

» My GTD Odyssey - Part 1 from Genuine Curiosity
As I mentioned in my last post, I've had somewhat of a breakthrough with Getting Things Done recently, and I want to share what I've learned in hopes that it will benefit at least one other person. To you GTD [Read More]

» My GTD Odyssey - Part 1 from Genuine Curiosity
As I mentioned in my last post, I've had somewhat of a breakthrough with Getting Things Done recently, and I want to share what I've learned in hopes that it will benefit at least one other person. To you GTD [Read More]

» My GTD Odyssey - Part 1 from Genuine Curiosity
As I mentioned in my last post, I've had somewhat of a breakthrough with Getting Things Done recently, and I want to share what I've learned in hopes that it will benefit at least one other person. To you GTD [Read More]

Comments

Personally, I can't concentrate on one task for long. I get bored and become progressively less effective. I enjoy jumping from task to task - I'm actually energized by the process.

Corey: Each of us will respond to different length chunks. You can do a varierty of tasks each day, but should try to focus on one thing at a time and reduce interruptions and distractions. I get bored easily, too, so I understadn where you are coming from!

In software engineering, we have a principle called Time Boxing which describes a method of working in fixed time periods. A given task is either done at the end of this period or another time slot (on another day) is scheduled to continue.

Have a look at my post on Time Boxing:

http://www.davecheong.com/2006/07/26/time-boxing-is-an-effective-getting-things-done-strategy/

Dave: Thanks for the link about Time Boxing, it's a great post!

Wow! This is great stuff. It sounds like chunking and time boxing could work very well together. I've been looking for ways to work more effectively. Eureka!

Cathy - Yep, works like acharm - good luck!

I have to wonder what you were doing when you were "multi-tasking"? Because chunking sounds an awful lot like the same thing with a new name and a slightly hipper gloss.

Erica - if they don't seem different, I did not explain them very well, because there is a big difference. When chunking, you don't leave your email open, you don't take phone calls, and you don't let interruptions occur. When multitasking, we work on lots of things at the same time.

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