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August 13, 2007

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Great quotations Lisa from a great book.
Quick question is there a typo in the second quote? Should it read "may well be" instead of "made well be"? I'm not trying to pick, I'm trying to uderstand - and right now I can't quite get it. Any help would be appreciated!

Kevin :)

Yep, it's a typo - thanks! Fixed!

Edgar Schein is "the Man" when it comes to this topic. I remember trekking to Boston some years ago to hear him speak at a conference. It was well worth it.

In the 90's, I was the "culture manager" (aka OD) for a fast-rising telecom company (that was eventually bought by AT&T). We defined culture as "the way we do things here" and tied it to customer service, quality, process improvement, innovation, internal communication, teamwork, and leadership.

Terry

Terry - Wow, I would have driven across the state to hear him, too. I bet that was a great experience.

I felt the same way when I finally met David Cooperrider (God of Appreciative Inquiry). I had been studying his work for so long - hearig him and absorbing his tone of voice and mannerisms made a big difference.

Yes, organizational cultures are create and destroyed (when necessary) by leaders, but I think there's a long way in between creation and destruction, and that in a nut shell is the 'change'.

It's a little further of a drive than across the state, but if you want to hear Edgar Schein in person he gives a week-long seminar in the summers at the Cape Cod Institute. I attended last year and was glad I had a chance to hear some of his stories and meet other people with similar interests. More info here: http://www.cape.org/2008/schein.html.

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