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February 26, 2010

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Very apt - I really enjoyed reading that. Entertaining, and makes it's point known. Good job!

Oh man. I love this Lisa.

Mike, Heather, and Dick. So glad you like the post.

Lisa, you rock. Again.

Thanks Rosa! this post has made me think about MY tendency to be a story teller and perhaps, sometimes, on occasion, if I am on a roll, talk beyond the point of contribution.

Shortest blog post comments ever!

R U suggesting that people tweet their meeting statements before saying them?

Well, Clay, that might not be a bad idea for those companies that are tech savvy enough for that. And for the others, the "spirit" of a tweet-sized response is interesting.

Thomas Jefferson once said: "The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do." Brilliant!

Sue - great quote, thanks so much. This is such a different mindset and I know many people define leadership as TALKING. Which it is not, of course.

Many years ago I learned that there's an important distinction between speaking to express and speaking to impress. Having a conscious bias for the latter is a helpful tool in these situations.

(I could probably get that down 25 words or less)

Mike

This was very well said. There have been so times I have sat in a meeting and rolled my eyes back in my head, thinking, "Just get to the point!" But, I also know that especially if information is new, or complex, it can take several ways of expressing something before everyone gets it. We listen to things in different ways, and I worry that brief fast snippets like twitter bytes don't really engage people to work creatively and with each other from a deep place of listening. There is an interesting video with Werner Erhard talking about why we do what we do as human beings, and how the context of where we come from and how we listen matters. You might find it interesting. Why We Do What We Do: A New Model Providing Actionable Access to the Source of Performance

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