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July 21, 2011

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I found Henry Mintzberg's books "Managing" and "Managers not MBAs" indispensable. Drucker's "The Effective Executive" and Marcus Buckingham's books, "First, Break all the Rules" and "The One Thing You Need to Know", I refer to time and again. For something non-management related, but applicable, Nassim Taleb's book "The Black Swan" is excellent, and teaches the importance of not thinking that we can know and control everything.

Darin - those are some great classics you have on your list. They would make mine, too! I have not read Black Swan, however, and your reasoning is intriguing. The control issue is one in which many managers struggle.

I think Dr. David Weinberger sums up the paradigm shift (described differently in many articles), quite nicely: Transparency is the New Objectivity http://www.whatdoyouwantfromthem.com/members/blog_view.asp?id=560366&post=124183

Anna - very cool, thanks so much for sharing this.

I have recently read a book entitled "Boundary Spanning Leadership" by Chris Ernst and Donna Chrobot-Mason. In our organization we are finding ourselves needing to "re-think" how we get work done: less hierarchical and more moving through. Expert to expert whereever they "reside" in the organization. This requires managers to do their jobs differently. A book I read that relates to this is "Management Reset" by Lawler and Worley. Both of these books have sparked new ways of thinking about how we manage/lead. For my organization it is the new vision.

Johanna - thanks so much for both recommendations! I had forgotten about Lawler's book, and I have that on my bookshelves!

An all-time classic that I have always liked is "A Passion for Excellence" by Austin and Peters - all chapters end with thought provoking questions for the reader, and I think this intro'd Management By Wandering Around, which really does work for me like they say.

I recently wrote about the top ten characteristics of horrible bosses. I see it as a lesson on what to do by knowing what not to do. Enjoy your site, and wanted to share. http://middleclasskeith.blogspot.com/2011/07/horrible-bosses.html

I don't disagree with this writing!!!

You couldn't be more right on...

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